Loading

Create a free account and get instant & exclusive access to all that Decks.com has to offer:

Checkmark 1,000+ How-To articles
Checkmark 80+ Free Deck Plans
Checkmark Deck Planning Calculators
Checkmark Free & Simple Deck Design Tool

Concrete Deck Footing

This footing type uses a concrete pier that extends from the footing base to above grade. There are several variations of this footing type that are commonly used.

Small diameter footings may use a cardboard form tube that is set to the acceptable depth and filled with concrete to produce a monolithic footing.



For larger diameter footings, it is more practical to pour a footing base to the appropriate size and depth and extend the footing to the surface with a smaller diameter pier. In order to sufficiently connect the footing to the pier, you will want to use two L-shaped pieces of rebar.

The top of the pier will need to be fitted with a concrete anchor and post base connector in order to accept the deck post. There are different kinds of concrete anchors to choose from that can be installed. Some anchors are set while the concrete is still wet; others are predrilled and then tightened with a wrench to expand into the hardened concrete. Post bases are designed to lock into the concrete anchors and connect to the support posts. The anchor, post base and support post will have to come together in a relatively small area. Using an adjustable post base can give you a little more room to work with.

Footings that use concrete piers offer several advantages over other methods. Once the footings are in place, they will provide permanent visible evidence of the support strength of the structure. Also, this type of footing makes it much easier to replace a post if one ever becomes damaged. You can modify this type of footing by using a rigid plastic base form that is engineered to create a flared base to help prevent frost heaving.

Square footings offer the benefit of maximizing the surface area for soil compression. This variation typically makes more sense where shallow footings are required because hand digging will be required.


Popular Footings Articles
Concrete

Cutting a Concrete Pad

Learn how to use a concrete saw to cut a hole in a patio slab to install a deck footing.

Footing Installation

Can I use pier blocks?

Our inspector explains the pros and cons of using pier blocks for deck foundations.

Footing Installation

Digging Foundations

Learn how to hand dig or mechanically dig your deck footings with step-by-step instructions. Learn what to do if you hit a rock.

Next Step: Framing Articles
Deck Support Columns

How to Decorate Deck Support Columns

Browse some examples of decorative deck support posts for tall decks.

Deck Support Columns

How to Install Concrete Support Deck Posts & Columns

Learn how to install concrete deck piers to support your deck frame. Use cardboard form tubes to extend your footings above grade.

Deck Support Columns

Deck Bracing

Learn how to install knee bracing in-between your deck support posts to provide extra strength against high winds and to prevent racking forces for tall decks.

Get more helpful resources delivered right to your inbox

Explore Articles by Topic

Create a free account and get instant & exclusive access to all that Decks.com has to offer:

Checkmark 1,000+ How-To articles
Checkmark 80+ Free Deck Plans
Checkmark Deck Planning Calculators
Checkmark Free & Simple Deck Design Tool
Footing Types

Concrete Deck Footing

This footing type uses a concrete pier that extends from the footing base to above grade. There are several variations of this footing type that are commonly used.

Small diameter footings may use a cardboard form tube that is set to the acceptable depth and filled with concrete to produce a monolithic footing.



For larger diameter footings, it is more practical to pour a footing base to the appropriate size and depth and extend the footing to the surface with a smaller diameter pier. In order to sufficiently connect the footing to the pier, you will want to use two L-shaped pieces of rebar.

The top of the pier will need to be fitted with a concrete anchor and post base connector in order to accept the deck post. There are different kinds of concrete anchors to choose from that can be installed. Some anchors are set while the concrete is still wet; others are predrilled and then tightened with a wrench to expand into the hardened concrete. Post bases are designed to lock into the concrete anchors and connect to the support posts. The anchor, post base and support post will have to come together in a relatively small area. Using an adjustable post base can give you a little more room to work with.

Footings that use concrete piers offer several advantages over other methods. Once the footings are in place, they will provide permanent visible evidence of the support strength of the structure. Also, this type of footing makes it much easier to replace a post if one ever becomes damaged. You can modify this type of footing by using a rigid plastic base form that is engineered to create a flared base to help prevent frost heaving.

Square footings offer the benefit of maximizing the surface area for soil compression. This variation typically makes more sense where shallow footings are required because hand digging will be required.


Popular Footings Articles
Concrete

Cutting a Concrete Pad

Learn how to use a concrete saw to cut a hole in a patio slab to install a deck footing.

Footing Installation

Can I reuse existing footings

Our inspector discusses the topic of reusing footings for a new deck.

Footing Installation

Installing footings on a sloped yard

Our inspector explains how to install concrete deck footings on uneven ground.

Next Step: Framing Articles
Deck Support Columns

How to Decorate Deck Support Columns

Browse some examples of decorative deck support posts for tall decks.

Deck Framing

How to Build a Multi-Level Deck

Multi-level decks are very popular. Learn how to build a deck that steps up or down using shared posts and footing connections.

Deck Framing

Using Shims to Level the Deck Surface

Install shims or notch joist bottom across uneven joists to level your deck surface.

Get more helpful resources delivered right to your inbox

Explore Articles by Topic